This is
Masi.

Masi has been synonymous with quality and innovation for more than 90 years. Faliero Masi was considered a genius and visionary and his dedication to the individual needs of each and every rider that entered his world, earned him the nickname of "The Tailor" and a reputation as one of the greatest custom bicycle builders of all time.

In 1973, Masi arrived in Carlsbad, California. Under the watchful eye of Faliero, a new era of steel racing bike production began. The iconic Masi Gran Criterium became the company's flagship model; a symbol of Masi’s ambition and unique style that makes it a highly collectible bicycle amongst enthusiasts and "Masiphiles" still today.

A strong commitment to innovation, tradition, and engineered ride quality have been in our DNA for decades and form the leading edge of our core values today. Simply put, It's all about the ride.

This is Masi.

Born on May 11, 1908 in Sesto Fiorentino-a commune to the northwest of Florence-Faliero Masi grew up among a generation of young Florentines for whom the bicycle became a catalyst for a new quality of life. Bike racing had emerged in Florence, in the 1870's. The collective efforts of local enthusiasts, journalists, and some artisan bicycle workshops had staged demonstration races and bicycle tours on strange looking, high-wheeled contraptions.

By the early 1900s, design, manufacturing, and technology had improved greatly and a series of competitive organized races across the province rallied the communities and defined the uniquely deep connection that the rural population had formed with the Velopedistica.

Like many of his friends, a young Faliero Masi began racing in the youth ranks of the local Tuscan Championships during the early 1920s. Eventually moving on to race at a national level.

Racing bicycles wasn’t Masi’s only passion. While serving a mechanical apprenticeship at the workshop of Campostrini, he continued to compete professionally while setting his sights on designing and building a frame to his own specification.

Faliero’s impressive reputation within the emerging movement of young frame builders in Italy opened the door to new opportunities, ultimately culminating in the opening of a boutique style workshop underneath the Vigorelli Velodrome in Milan.


Vigorelli Velodrome, Milan, Italy

Masi’s quiet dedication aligned him with the fastest racers in the world. The Vigorelli workshop became a destination where racers from different countries, teams, and disciplines consulted with Masi to find a new formula and an advantage.


Fausto Coppi riding a Masi built frame for Team Tricofilina in 1959

Faliero Masi was their ally, and in a small corner of Milan's famous Vigorelli stadium, the visionary young Tuscan quietly went about the business of forging vital partnerships with some of the greatest athletes in the history of the sport.

Names like
Maspes, Magni,
Coppi, Harris, Van Looy,
Bobet, Bahamontes,
Nencini,
Pambianco,
Simpson, Adorni,
and Merckx would all race on Masi
built frames.


Antonio Maspes at the Vigorelli in 1962

"Masi was the best frame builder and bike fitter of all time. Every rider he put on a bike was perfectly positioned. He had a gift and he taught many people how to build bicycles to these highest standards."

Irio Tommasini


Faliero (Right) and Italian Sprinter Aldo Bini

By the mid 1960s cycling in America begins to grow. A new generation of bike racers fuels a coming boom in cycling, and with it comes a demand for European brands across the globe.


Eddie Merckx on a steep climb during the Monument Race of Liege-Bastogne in 1969. Flanked here by Roger Swerts and Victor Van Schil. All three riders are seen on Masi frames that Merckx would often collect en masse from the Vigorelli himself.

In the summer of 1971, a chance encounter between Marcel Calborn and Roland Sahm lays the groundwork to begin manufacturing bicycles in Southern California. Sahm, Calborn and Aluminum magnate G. Roger Smith begin searching for an Italian brand with which to partner and on December 20, 1972 Faliero Masi and Sahm agree to bring the Masi trademark and manufacturing to the United States. Faliero would stay on to train and ensure traditions, methodology and quality standards remained in the brand’s new location.


Roland Sahm and a young Mario Confente in 1974

September 1973, Faliero arrives in Carlsbad with the final pieces of tooling required to initiate production of US made Gran Criteriums. He’s soon followed by Mario Confente and two of his assistants, charged with bringing the American team up to speed. By Christmas the first batch of 25 Masi Gran Criterium frames emerged. The frames were all 57cm in size and each had a serial number preceded by the prefix "S1."


Confente at Masi USA in Carlsbad, CA

Masi introduced the very first investment cast lugs to the world in 1975. It was a breakthrough moment that would become the industry standard.

In the summer of 1977, Roland Sahm transferred Cicli Masi’s future to a former racer who had been connected to Masi USA since it’s inception. As the new owner of Masi USA, Ted Kirkbride would guide US manufacturing through Masi’s next successful era.


Ted Kirkbride (far right) representing the United States at the Vuelta Mexico in 1951

A strong commitment to innovation, tradition, and engineered ride quality have been in our DNA for decades and form the leading edge of our core values today. Simply put, It's all about the ride. This is Masi.

Masi has been synonymous with quality and innovation for more than 90 years. Faliero Masi was considered a genius and visionary and his dedication to the individual needs of each and every rider that entered his world, earned him the nickname of "The Tailor" and a reputation as one of the greatest custom bicycle builders of all time.

In 1973, Masi arrived in Carlsbad, California. Under the watchful eye of Faliero, a new era of steel racing bike production began. The iconic Masi Gran Criterium became the company's flagship model; a symbol of Masi’s ambition and unique style that makes it a highly collectible bicycle amongst enthusiasts and "Masiphiles" still today.

Born on May 11, 1908 in Sesto Fiorentino-a commune to the northwest of Florence-Faliero Masi grew up among a generation of young Florentines for whom the bicycle became a catalyst for a new quality of life. Bike racing had emerged in Florence, in the 1870's. The collective efforts of local enthusiasts, journalists, and some artisan bicycle workshops had staged demonstration races and bicycle tours on strange looking, high-wheeled contraptions.

By the early 1900s, design, manufacturing, and technology had improved greatly and a series of competitive organized races across the province rallied the communities and defined the uniquely deep connection that the rural population had formed with the Velopedistica.

Like many of his friends, a young Faliero Masi began racing in the youth ranks of the local Tuscan Championships during the early 1920s. Eventually moving on to race at a national level.

Racing bicycles wasn’t Masi’s only passion. While serving a mechanical apprenticeship at the workshop of Campostrini, he continued to compete professionally while setting his sights on designing and building a frame to his own specification.

Faliero’s impressive reputation within the emerging movement of young frame builders in Italy opened the door to new opportunities, ultimately culminating in the opening of a boutique style workshop underneath the Vigorelli Velodrome in Milan.


Vigorelli Velodrome, Milan, Italy

Masi’s quiet dedication aligned him with the fastest racers in the world. The Vigorelli workshop became a destination where racers from different countries, teams, and disciplines consulted with Masi to find a new formula and an advantage.


Fausto Coppi riding a Masi built frame for Team Tricofilina in 1959

Faliero Masi was their ally, and in a small corner of Milan's famous Vigorelli stadium, the visionary young Tuscan quietly went about the business of forging vital partnerships with some of the greatest athletes in the history of the sport.

Names like
Maspes, Magni,
Coppi, Harris, Van Looy,
Bobet, Bahamontes,
Nencini,
Pambianco,
Simpson, Adorni,
and Merckx would all race on Masi
built frames.


Antonio Maspes at the Vigorelli in 1962

"Masi was the best frame builder and bike fitter of all time. Every rider he put on a bike was perfectly positioned. He had a gift and he taught many people how to build bicycles to these highest standards."

Irio Tommasini


Faliero (Right) and Italian Sprinter Aldo Bini

By the mid 1960s cycling in America begins to grow. A new generation of bike racers fuels a coming boom in cycling, and with it comes a demand for European brands across the globe.


Eddie Merckx on a steep climb during the Monument Race of Liege-Bastogne in 1969. Flanked here by Roger Swerts and Victor Van Schil. All three riders are seen on Masi frames that Merckx would often collect en masse from the Vigorelli himself.

In the summer of 1971, a chance encounter between Marcel Calborn and Roland Sahm lays the groundwork to begin manufacturing bicycles in Southern California. Sahm, Calborn and Aluminum magnate G. Roger Smith begin searching for an Italian brand with which to partner and on December 20, 1972 Faliero Masi and Sahm agree to bring the Masi trademark and manufacturing to the United States. Faliero would stay on to train and ensure traditions, methodology and quality standards remained in the brand’s new location.


Roland Sahm and a young Mario Confente in 1974

September 1973, Faliero arrives in Carlsbad with the final pieces of tooling required to initiate production of US made Gran Criteriums. He’s soon followed by Mario Confente and two of his assistants, charged with bringing the American team up to speed. By Christmas the first batch of 25 Masi Gran Criterium frames emerged. The frames were all 57cm in size and each had a serial number preceded by the prefix "S1."


Confente at Masi USA in Carlsbad, CA

Masi introduced the very first investment cast lugs to the world in 1975. It was a breakthrough moment that would become the industry standard.

In the summer of 1977, Roland Sahm transferred Cicli Masi’s future to a former racer who had been connected to Masi USA since it’s inception. As the new owner of Masi USA, Ted Kirkbride would guide US manufacturing through Masi’s next successful era.


Ted Kirkbride (far right) representing the United States at the Vuelta Mexico in 1951

A strong commitment to innovation, tradition, and engineered ride quality have been in our DNA for decades and form the leading edge of our core values today. Simply put, It's all about the ride. This is Masi.